About briancurragh

I have a Masters Degree (Distinction) in First World War Studies from the University of Birmingham's Centre of War Studies - with my dissertation focussing on the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars.

Colonel (Retired) T L May CBE DL lately Chairman of the Oxfordshire Yeomanry Trust and Director of Soldiers of Oxfordshire.

Very sad news today about the passing of Colonel Tim May on Thursday 10th December 2015.  Apart from his immense role in promoting the Oxford Yeomanry and the establishment of the superb museum now open in Woodstock – his role in Winston Churchill’s state funeral has gone down in history.

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I covered this incident in my Masters Dissertation on the Queen’s Own Oxfordshire Hussars as follows:

The final act that illustrates Churchill’s continuing connection with the QOOH, came with his plans for his own funeral. The stipulation that the QOOH was not only to be included in the procession but to be the fifth military detachment, a position that placed the detachment ahead of the Guards regiments.[1] This provoked a Guards officer to suggest to Major Timothy May, QOOH commander on the day, that the QOOH were “incorrectly” arranged to which May responded “In the Oxfordshire Yeomanry we always do state funerals this way”.[2]

[1] Operation Hope Not, TNA, DEFE 25/38.

[2] Jenkins, Winston Churchill, Oxfordshire Hussar, p.61.

Churchill funeral for Katie

Requiescat in pace.

Captain the Hon. Arthur Edward Bruce O’Neill (1876-1914)

Does anyone know the source for this photograph of Arthur O’Neill or has access to a better copy than this?  This was copied off the excellent “The History of Parliament” blog which noted O’Neill as the first Member of Parliament to lose his life in active service during the Great War.  All suggestions gratefully received!

fwwoneill

Helion First World War Prizes for Scholarship

In conjunction with the Western Front Association, those nice people at Helion & Co* have introduced three annual prizes for book proposals coming out of research carried out either privately, as part of a Masters Degree study or as part of a PhD project. The three prizes will total £6,000 per annum so represent a very significant investment into research currently being carried out. The three awards will be entitled the Terraine Prize for private research; the Holmes Prize for MA research and the Edmonds Prize for PhD research. The 2015 Prizes will be announced in November so if you are involved in projects that are relevant, get your book proposal in the running. More details here.

* – I might be slightly biased as Helion published “Stemming The Tide” (now out in paperback) so clearly have enormous promise in spotting new talent!

Helion-and-WFA-prizes-flyer

Divisional demarcation at the Battle of Loos

When researching for my chapter on the Battle of Loos – to be included in the follow up volume to “Stemming The Tide: Officers and Leadership in The British Expeditionary Force 1914”, I came across an interchange of memoranda between Major-Generals George Thesiger, commanding 9th (Scottish) Division, and Thompson Capper, commanding 7th Division, which sheds some light on the nature of the day to day relationship between divisions placed alongside each other in the frontline. The two divisions were then part of I Corps under Hubert Gough and were readying themselves for the battle that was to commence in fourteen days time.

Thesiger had sent a type-written note to 7th Division which was couched in a somewhat administrative and officious manner:
Screenshot 2014-12-20 18.05.20“As there seems to have been some misunderstanding about the new fire trench from K sap to your left sap head, I should like to point out that this Division does not recognise and has never recognised any responsibility for this portion of the line. The 120 yards of fire trench that the 9th Division has dug…has been undertaken by this Division voluntarily as a “quid pro quo” for the trench which was dug from Fontes des Marichons to Barts and afterwards handed over to us by the 7th Division and in order to work in a friendly spirit with this Division….I shall be glad if the 7th Division will undertake all further responsibility for this Section of the line. Do you agree to this arrangement?”

Capper responded by handwriting on the back of the memorandum the following: “As regards the labour of placing accessories in position, I understand you have to handle a number proportionate to those we have to handle as 3 is to 2. Under these conditions, I think the best plan would before us to completely take over the new trench…We would undertake all liabilities for the new trench…I will send a staff officer to meet anyone you delegate…and arrange the boundary mark.”
Screenshot 2014-12-20 18.05.34Both Thesiger and Capper were to be killed in action in the opening days of Loos and it is sometimes easy to get caught up in the action of the battle, thereby losing sight of the daily “management” tasks of commanders in the field. Who was responsible for which trench was simply one of the thousands of details that were under consideration by the staff at divisional and corps levels leading up to an offensive and gives a small insight into the scale of the operations these men were facing.

“Notre Joffre”

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A recent visit to The National Archives unearthed the following interesting sketches from Haig’s diary. The drawings are by Commandant E. Requin, a liaison officer between General Joffre and General d’Urbals’s HQ.

The first sketch shows Joffre himself and then a soldier of the 97th Regiment.iPhone 119

The next is two views of Private J Dalzell of “The New Army”iPhone 120

The final sketch shows a pipe-smoking French solder in his dress uniform.iPhone 121

Haig thought the sketch of Joffre was “excellent” and noted that Requin had been at Aldershot.

The Library is open: The Ypres Times

Screenshot 2014-08-13 21.18.58With the Centenary already underway, i thought it was about time I made some documents I have originals of available to those who might find them useful or interesting.

As a start, I will be uploading six copies of The Ypres Times from 1922 & 1925 – the first three have been added today – January & October 1922 and April 1925 – with the remaining three to follow over the next week.  I will gradually add other document as they emerge from the archives.

I do hope you enjoy them – they are a fascinating insight into the postwar commemoration of the “sacred earth” and include many personal accounts that, in all likelihood, were not published elsewhere.

The Library